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Photo credit: Christian Mooney / Courtesy of Arcade, London
CAS News 21 Dec 2018 By Marcus Crofton

Middlesbrough Institute of Modern Art wins the inaugural Jackson Tang Ceramics Award, receiving bold new work by Chiara Camoni

Camoni’s ceramic practice is intimately embedded in her daily life and has a collaborative aspect that sees friends and relatives invited to assist her in making the work.

Gonçalo Mabunda, The Impenetrable Throne, 2019. Courtesy of Jack Bell Gallery
Friday Dispatch 24 May 2019 By Christine Takengny

Gonçalo Mabunda: Orator of Time at Jack Bell Gallery, London

Mabunda aims to explore the collective memory of his home country that has been scarred by a long and violent Civil War.

Edmund de Waal, ‘the library of exile’ (2019) at Ateneo Veneto. Part of ‘psalm’, an exhibition in two parts at the Jewish Museum and Ateneo Veneto, Venice. © Edmund de Waal. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Fulvio Orsenigo
Friday Dispatch 17 May 2019 By Caroline Douglas

‘Edmund de Waal: Psalm’ at Museo Ebraico and Ateneo Veneto, Venice

de Waal’s project connects human experience across many centuries, cultures and countries and, in its way, is as political as it is poetic.

Image: Prabhavathi Meppayil. Photography by Damian Griffiths. Courtesy of the artist and Pace Gallery, London.
Friday Dispatch 10 May 2019 By Vassilios Doupas

Prabhavathi Meppayil at Pace Gallery, London

Indian art is often associated with vibrant colours and heavy symbolism. Prabhavathi Meppayil’s work, which is currently on view at Pace Gallery London, dispels such expectations: the artist makes work…

Denzil Forrester, ‘Wolf Singer’, 1984. Oil on canvas. Copyright Denzil Forrester. Courtesy the artist and Stephen Friedman Gallery, London.
Friday Dispatch 3 May 2019 By Christine Takengny

Denzil Forrester: A Survey at Stephen Friedman Gallery

It is a revelation to witness so many large-scale canvases by a long-overlooked artist, who has had to fight for his place within an art world that has been seen as white and western until very recently.

Image: Peter Doig, 'Untitled (Wheelchair)', 2019 and 'Untitled (Small Wheel Chair)', 2019, installation view Secession 2019. Photo: Hannes Böck, Courtesy the artist and Michael Werner Gallery, New York and London / Bildrecht Vienna, 2019
Friday Dispatch 26 Apr 2019 By Caroline Douglas

Peter Doig at Secession, Vienna

Whilst he is an artist in the third decade of his career and the term ‘mastery’ would not be misplaced, the paintings here evince a persisting restlessness about the act of painting itself.

Caroline Achaintre, 'Om Nom Ore', 2015
Art Consultancy 25 Apr 2019 By teamcas

CAS Consultancy acquires new work for Inflexion’s Marylebone offices

New acquisitions include works by Caroline Achaintre, Marie Lund, Victoria Morton, Ruairiadh O’Connell, Tyra Tingleff and Jorinde Voigt, continuing the collection’s focus on abstraction and elegance of materials.

Li Yuan Chia, Untitled, c1993. Courtesy the Estate of Li Yuan Chia
CAS Recommends By Marcus Crofton

May 2019

An exhibition of photographs by Li Yuan Chia, considered China’s first conceptual artist and founder of the LYC Museum in Cumbria, is being presented at The Whitworth in Manchester this month.

Tamara Henderson, ‘Camera’, 2017. © Molonglo Group 2018. Courtesy of Tamara Henderson and Rodeo, London / Piraeus. Photography: Denis Mortell.
Recent Acquisitions 24 Apr 2019 By Jameela Thurloway

The CAS acquires ‘Camera’ by Tamara Henderson for The Hunterian, University of Glasgow

Interested in the itinerant life of the artist, where international exhibitions and residencies mean continual relocations and dislocations, Henderson often explores the way in which certain works are themselves conceived as journeys of transformation.

Detail of ‘World Play’ from ‘Wunderblock’, Emma Smith, Freud Museum London, 2019. Photograph by Karolina Urbaniak.
Artist to Watch By Jameela Thurloway

Emma Smith

Smith’s work investigates human relationships, specifically exploring hidden forms of connection: the intimate, the transient, the subconscious and the invisible.

Aliza Nisenbaum, ‘London Underground: Brixton and Victoria Line staff’, 2019. Commissioned by Art on the Underground. Photo: Angus Mill
Friday Dispatch 12 Apr 2019 By Christine Takengny

Aliza Nisenbaum at Brixton Underground Station, London

For Nisenbaum, the people she paints are not passive sitters but active and engaged collaborators who are depicted with grace, composure and pride at a time when society often treats them as invisible.

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